Quote of the day #22

“Intensive work engagement is an effective medicine that we should use in case of many problems that occur in life.

For example, when you are being treated unfairly at work or going through promotion discrimination, do not despair or complain that life isn’t fair, but rather respond by intensive work, start a new challenging project, enroll in a master’s degree program or in a doctoral program.

Such activities will occupy you completely, so that you will quickly overcome the problem and repair your injured self esteem.”
― Eraldo Banovac

Anxiety and fear

Hello, my dear writers and readers! It’s been a full week going on, and I haven’t posted so much because of my worries and stressful tasks. At times, I just wanted to get my things done so that I can relax or better said, sleep. It was a good plan altogether but it did not work as I have planned.

As you know from my previous posts, I have been excited about returning to the dentist and had my hopes up. That lasted just until I have arrived at the cabinet, of course. On that day it rained a lot, hence I had to walk because I missed the bus, took a tooth radiography, and went to the dentist.

Unfortunately, this lady had an examination team over to their cabinet, due to the Covid-19 Situation, and I had to wait for two hours in the rain and cold. In the morning when I left it was like 30 degrees Celsius, and then it turned out to 15.

When I arrived to see her, I don’t know if I was shaking because I was afraid of the procedure or because of the cold weather. She felt pity for me, and we eventually, had to reschedule the tooth surgery because I have also had an infection. Great!

Now a new treatment is required, and I haven’t even managed to finish the one for chronic gastritis and H. Pylori. This stress and anxiety made it worse for the stomach affection, and now it hurts again.

I’ve been alone mostly this week, and I just felt so stressed about work, knowing that the project will end in a few months, and I have had so many negative thoughts in my mind, that I almost can’t describe. I’ve even considering applying for other jobs to be assured in the future.

Plus, I have to work two weekends, and we should return to the office, things that I can’t do yet because of my tooth infection and the medical procedures. This, and because the office has the air conditioner too strong.

This week I felt the need to cry, to scream, to disappear. I feel so overwhelmed with everything, and I am very anxious. But this needs to end, and I have to get back on the right track. Even if it’s hard and painful, I have to be faithful and trust God, knowing that this too, shall pass.

(Image Source – Unsplash, Katherine Gu)

Quote of the day #20

“Garraty wondered how it would be, to lie in the biggest, dustiest library silence of all, dreaming endless, thoughtless dreams behind your gummed-down eyelids, dressed forever in your Sunday suit. No worries about money, success, fear, joy, pain, sorrow, sex, or love. Absolute zero. No father, mother, girlfriend, lover. The dead are orphans. No company but the silence like a moth’s wing. An end to the agony of movement, to the long nightmare of going down the road. The body in peace, stillness, and order. The perfect darkness of death.

How would that be? Just how would that be?”
― Stephen King, The Long Walk

Cavities

Hello, my dear readers and writers! As you know from my previous post, I have experienced some dental issues and I have to take care of my oral hygiene more than I did before. Because cavities.

What are cavities?

Cavities are caused by tooth decay. Tooth decay can affect both the outer coating of a tooth (called enamel) and the inner layer (called dentin).

Cavities are formed when foods rich in carbohydrates like bread, cereal, milk, soda, fruit, cake, candy, etc stay on our teeth. In this way, the bacteria in our mouth transforms them into acids.

The bacteria, acid, food debris, and our saliva combine to form plaque, which clings to the teeth. The acids in plaque dissolve the enamel, creating holes called cavities.

Untreated, cavities get larger and affect deeper layers of our teeth. Cleaning our teeth should be a habit, as in time, cavities develop and we may suffer from severe pain, infections, and tooth loss.

How tooth decay occurs

As I mentioned, cavities are formed by tooth decay, which is a process that occurs in time.

Plaque forms. Dental plaque is a clear sticky film that coats our teeth. It’s due to eating a lot of sugars and starches and not cleaning our teeth well. When sugars and starches aren’t cleaned off our teeth, bacteria quickly begin feeding on them and form plaque. Plaque that stays on your teeth can harden under or above our gum line into tartar (calculus). Tartar makes plaque more difficult to remove and creates a shield for bacteria.

Plaque attacks. The acids in plaque remove minerals in our tooth’s hard, outer enamel. This erosion causes tiny openings or holes in the enamel — the first stage of cavities. Once areas of enamel are worn away, the bacteria and acid can reach the next layer of our teeth, called dentin. This layer is softer than enamel and less resistant to acid. Dentin has tiny tubes that directly communicate with the nerve of the tooth causing sensitivity.

Destruction continues. As tooth decay develops, the bacteria and acid continue their march through our teeth, moving next to the inner tooth material (pulp) that contains nerves and blood vessels. The pulp becomes swollen and irritated from the bacteria. Because there is no place for the swelling to expand inside of a tooth, the nerve becomes pressed, causing pain. Discomfort can even extend outside of the tooth root to the bone.

What causes cavities?

Foods that cling to our teeth for a long time, such as milk, ice cream, honey, sugar, soda, dried fruit, cake, cookies, hard candy and mints, dry cereal, and chips — are more prone to cause decay than foods that are easily washed away by saliva.

Frequent snacking and sipping. Even if it is recommended in certain diets, the frequent snacking and sipping give mouth bacteria more fuel to produce acids that attack our teeth and wear them down. The situation gets worse if we consume acidic drinks like Coca Cola.

Brushing. It’s very important to brush our teeth sooner after we eat or drink, because plaque forms quickly, and the first stages of tooth decay can begin.

Dry Mouth. Saliva prevents tooth decay by washing away the foods and plague from our teeth. Substances found in saliva also help counter the acid produced by bacteria.

Heartburn. Heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can cause stomach acid to flow into our mouth (reflux), wearing away the enamel of your teeth and causing significant tooth damage.

How to prevent cavities?

It is important to brush our teeth after we eat, preferably with fluoride toothpaste. To clean between teeth we can floss or use an interdental cleaner. We can also use a mouth wash with fluoride to wash away the excess foods between the teeth after the brushing process.

Eating tooth-friendly foods should be on our list as well. We should avoid foods that cling to our teeth, and brush soon after eating them, if required. Foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables increase saliva flow, and unsweetened coffee, tea, and sugar-free gum help wash away food particles.

It’s advised to avoid frequent snacking and sipping, because our teeth are constantly under attack, as we help our mouth bacteria create acids that can destroy tooth enamel.

Tap water is high in fluoride which can help reduce tooth decay significantly. If we only stick on to bottled water, we might miss the fluoride benefits.

In the end, it’s essential to consult with our dentist, have regular visits, and get professional help. The best advice that I can give is to start early. If you have a tooth sensitivity, a small cavity, don’t let it dwell and get worse. Seek professional help and have a healthy smile! 😉😁